Program Overview

 

Our mission is to train outstanding physician leaders who improve the health of people with respiratory disease and critical illness.

The Pulmonary and Critical Care Fellowship program at Wake Forest School of Medicine is accredited by the ACGME. Each year we welcome four new fellows, for a total of twelve fellows in the program. Major characteristics of our program include collegiality among fellows and faculty and an intentional focus on each fellow’s career. We provide excellent clinical and research experiences and individualize training to support the unique development goals of each fellow. Our graduates are community pulmonary and critical care medicine physicians, academic clinicians, physician-scientists, and thought-leaders at the local, national, and international levels.

Program Leadership

Program Director

Bald Caucasian man with red beard and mustache smiles Dr. Matthew Miles is an Associate Professor of Medicine in Pulmonary and Critical Care and has been program director since 2016. A clinician-educator, he holds a Master’s in Education and Curriculum Development from the University of Cincinnati and co-directs the pulmonary block for preclinical medical students at Wake Forest School of Medicine. Dr. Miles currently serves as the chair of the Training and Transitions committee for the American College of Chest Physicians, an international professional society of over 19,000 members in 100+ countries. He is also a member of the Education and Clinical Practice editorial board for the journal CHEST. Dr. Miles’s scholarly interests include implementation and effectiveness of educational curricula, clinical quality improvement through education, and creating resources for educators in pulmonary and critical care medicine. His clinical interests are in general pulmonary and critical care medicine, advanced diagnostic bronchoscopy, and interstitial lung disease. Dr. Miles has been recognized as a Distinguished CHEST Educator for 2018 and 2019 and received the inaugural Edward F. Haponik Fellows’ teaching award. He has also been chosen several times as a Master Teacher by the Wake Forest Internal Medicine residents.

Associate Program Director

Bearded Caucasian man with glasses stands outside and smilesDr. Chad Marion is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in Pulmonary and Critical Care and has been associate program director since 2018. Dr. Marion holds a Ph.D. in Investigative Medicine from Yale University and his interests include medical education and conducting both foundation and industry-sponsored clinical trials. He is currently the director of the Adult Cystic Fibrosis Center at Wake Forest Baptist Health. He is also the co-director of the pulmonary block for preclinical medical students at Wake Forest School of Medicine alongside Dr. Miles. Dr. Marion is the co-director of the online journal club for the American Thoracic Society’s Assembly of Pulmonary Infection and Mycobacterium Tuberculosis and is an active member of the assembly’s web committee and early career working group. Dr. Marion’s scholarly activities include investigating effective treatments, quality improvement, and optimizing multidisciplinary management of complex airways diseases with a particular interest in cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis not associated with cystic fibrosis. His clinical interests are in cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis not related to cystic fibrosis, severe asthma, non-tuberculosis pulmonary disease, pneumonia, and critical care medicine. Dr. Marion also plays an active role as the section of pulmonary and critical care’s champion of telehealth implementation. 

Program Coordinator

Blonde African American woman smiles at cameraMrs. Shannon Shields has been program coordinator since 2009. In this role she supports every aspect of the fellowship, including rotation scheduling, evaluation delivery, conferences, meetings, resources, travel, and the list goes on! She holds an Associate’s Degree in Business, which she obtained shortly before she came to the institution in 2003. Her favorite thing about being the program coordinator is working with the fellows. She sometimes looks at herself as being the “Mother” of our fellows, which is there to guide, and protect within the program. Mrs. Shields also enjoys being able to collaborate with the other leadership, in order to ensure that we continue to provide the very best opportunities possible for the fellows.