Program Overview

 

Our tailored program ensures fellows receive comprehensive training in infectious diseases through robust educational, research and clinical learning experiences.

During the two years of fellowship training, fellows are trained in the breadth of infectious diseases through inpatient and outpatient clinical, academic and research activities.

Clinical Rotations

Specialty certificate programs

During their training, fellows can pursue certificate training in the following areas

  • Antimicrobial stewardship
  • Global Health
  • Patient Safety and Quality
  • Translation and Health System Sciences

colorful, magnified illustration of various human pathogenic yeasts

 

Conferences and Didactics

During their training, fellows participate in a robust array of both faculty-led and fellow-led conferences spanning the breadth of topics in infectious diseases. The academic year starts off with a survival skills conference series. During the remainder of our academic year, fellows participate in the following conferences on a weekly basis:

  • Infectious Diseases Grand Rounds
  • Didactic conference 
  • Academic Half Day
    • Internal Medicine Grand Rounds
    • Journal Club, Research conference, M and M, or ID Board Review
    • HIV conference series
    • Micro rounds

Formal curricula in the following areas are built into the fellows’ conference series:

  • Antimicrobial Stewardship
  • Global Health 
  • Professional development (encompasses: career options, community ID practice models, physician contracts, compensation, billing and coding)
  • Medical education

Training Sites

The primary training site is at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, a premier academic medical center that serves a four-state referral area. Fellows also rotate through the VA and local health departments. Clinical care activities provide fellows experience with the complete spectrum of pathology in our subspecialty. We enjoy collegial relationships with all our colleagues and collaborate with clinical microbiology and pharmacy to provide superior patient care and superb educational experiences for our trainees. 

Additional training options 

An additional year of training is available in research, critical care, or addiction medicine

culture of aerobic bacteria on agar plate, biohazard sign in background. Selective focus on petri dish, slightly blue tonedResearch

An NIH-funded training program (TL1) is offered through Wake Forest Clinical and Translational Science Institute and the Division of Public Health Sciences. Fellows have the option to pursue a certificate in Translational and Health System Science or Master of Science degree (M.S.) in Translational & Health System Science. A Hazzard Scholars Program is also available to support fellows during a third year to conduct research and to pursue a Master of Science degree (M.S.) in Clinical and Population Translational Sciences (CPTS) if desired. Both masters’ degree programs offer an emphasis in antibiotic stewardship and infection prevention.

Critical Care

Infectious Diseases fellows may pursue an additional year of subspecialty fellowship training in Critical Care Medicine upon completion of their 2-year core ID training. Fellows who are interested in this option can participate in a critical care elective during their first year of ID fellowship then apply to the critical care program early in their second year of ID fellowship.

Addiction Medicine

Infectious Diseases fellows may pursue an additional year of subspecialty fellowship training in Addiction Medicine upon completion of their 2-year core ID training. Fellows who are interested in this option can participate in an addiction medicine elective during their first year of ID fellowship then apply to the addiction medicine program early in their second year of ID fellowship.